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Help for Caregivers

Assistance for Those Caring for Elderly Relatives

The EAP is committed to helping those who are helping others.  We will have a special guest come to present ideas to those who are caring for elderly parents, relatives or friends.
 
Regina Curran, MA CMC, is a geriatric care manager. She assists older adults and persons with disabilities reach their maximum functional potential.  The person’s independence is encouraged, while safety and security concerns are addressed.
 
Every person’s circumstances are different.  Families can be faced with many alternatives and may not know how to choose the alternative that will be the best fit for that person and that  family.  Geriatric care managers can help identify alternatives and provide guidance to help a family as they address the needs of the older adult or the person with disabilities.
 
Regina Curran is the President of the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the National Caregivers Association.  She will be at the EAP on April 26, Friday, at noon to share information and answer questions. 
 
Seating is limited, so reserve your spot now by emailing Maureen in the EAP at mmccarre@psych.umaryland.edu or by calling 8-0412.
 
Information on geriatric care  management is available at http://www.caremanager.org/ .
 

National Prevention Week is coming

SAMHSA has prevention ideas for you

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United States Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - A Life in the Community for Everyone: Behavioral Health is Essential to Health, Prevention Works, Treatment is Effective, People Recover

Support National Prevention Week, May 12‒18, 2013. Your voice. Your choice. Make a difference.

Help Support Prevention in Your Community

National Prevention Week 2013 will take place May 12–18, 2013. This year’s theme emphasizes that the prevention of substance abuse and promotion of mental health starts with the choices each of us makes in our own life. Through our choices, we can set an example of health and well-being for others. With our voices—whether spoken or written—we can raise awareness of behavioral health issues and help create healthier and safer communities.

You can plan and host your own events, participate in the “I Choose” project, or take the “Prevention Pledge” to show your support and help raise awareness about behavioral health issues.

Learn More About National Prevention Week 2013


Focus on Prevention

Learn How To Develop Your Own Prevention Strategy

This guide helps communities in planning and delivering substance abuse prevention strategies. It covers conducting needs assessments, identifying partners, creating effective strategies, marketing, reaching special populations, and evaluating your program. It includes a sample timeline of tasks and sample materials to save you time.

Order Focus on Prevention

On-Line Support Group

Email Group for Caregivers?

Are you caring for someone?  Is it difficult for you to find time for yourself? Would you like to be part of an email group with others in the same situation?  You could share ideas, frustrations, offer solutions, etc.   The Employee Assistance Program is in the process of developing an on-line support group for Caregivers. If you are interested in the group, please email Maureen at mmccarre@psych.umaryland.edu or call 410.328.0412.

Sad During the Winter?

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Many people suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder, otherwise known as SAD, during the fall and winter when there is less exposure to sunlight.  Sunlight triggers the production of serotonin, a chemical in the brain that helps regulate mood, among other things.  Many people have found that supplementation with Vitamin D can help.  Talk with your doctor to see if this might be a good strategy for you.

Stress Can Interfere with Sleep

How Can I Sleep Better?

Stress often interferes with sleep, which then can make the next day more difficult to manage.  If this continues, it can lead to depression, anxiety, irritability, and forgetfulness.  Many anti-depressants are effective because they help people sleep better.

Some people want to try natural ways to increase sleep and then boost mood.  First, take an inventory of your current habits.  Are you ingesting too much caffeine or drinking it too late in the day? Try decreasing coffee, tea, chocolate, and stop all caffeinated products by 2:00 p.m. Cigarettes, although initially relaxing for the smoker, are stimulants and add to sleep problems. Exercise is great to help people sleep better, but don’t do vigorous exercise late in the day or right before bed. Gentle stretching or a long walk late at night is better to help people sleep.  Alcohol helps people  feel sleepy but it interferes with the deepest phases of sleep and causes frequent nighttime awakenings. Do you have a medical problem such as back pain, or a thyroid disorder that may interfere with sleep?  Or, is the medication you’re taking hampering sleep? Try a little meditation or yoga and see if that helps you.  For more information, or to talk with someone about the issues that are bothering you or worrying you, call the EAP at 410.328.5860. Sometimes, having an objective person help you look at things differently can help decrease stress.  Sweet dreams!

How can Neurofeedback Help Me?

Neurofeedback helps YOUR brain work more efficiently

During a neurofeedback session, saline soaked electrodes will be placed on your head so that the frequencies of your brain can be read by the neurofeedback machine.  You will hear a sound when your brain is doing the right thing.  As you hear more sounds, your brain will be training itself.  You don’t have to DO anything.  Just sit and listen.  If you suffer from anxiety, your brain will learn to be calm; if you can’t focus, your brain will learn to concentrate better; if you have trouble sleeping, or have chronic pain, neurofeedback can help with all of that and more.  For more information, contact Maureen McCarren, Senior EAP counselor, at mmccarre@psych.umaryland.edu or 410.328.0412.

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week

February 24- March 7, 2013 – National Eating Disorders Awareness week.

The aim of National Eating Disorders Awareness (NED) week is to increase outreach and awareness of eating disorders and body image disorders, while reducing stigma and improving access to treatment resources.  Eating disorders are serious, life threatening illnesses-not choices- and it is important to recognize the pressures, attitudes and behaviors that shape the disorder.  For more information and volunteer opportunities, go to www.nationaleatingdisorders.org, or call Jan Buxton, Senior Counselor in the EAP.  You can reach Jan by calling 410-328-5860 or emailing her at jbuxton@psych.umaryland.edu.

Grief Support Group

Support Group Forming

The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has held a few different Grief Support Groups in the past. All have been very well received.  So, we are planning on starting another one.  It will begin on March 18 and last through May 20.  There will be weekly meetings, during lunchtime, noon-1:00p.m. in the EAP suite.  Space is limited, so call or mail us to register for the group as soon as you can.  Also, feel free to contact us if you have any questions.  Cheryl Confer, Senior EAP Counselor, will be facilitating the group.  You can reach her at 410.328.5860, or email at cconfer@psych.umaryland.edu.

Congratulations Ravens

Baltimore Ravens

The Employee Assistance Program would like to congratulate the Baltimore Ravens on winning the AFC championship game.  We wish you continued luck in the upcoming Super Bowl in New Orleans.

Aging Gracefully

How to Maintain Brain Health

As we age, we need to exercise our brains in various ways to keep them sharp.  Some ways to do that are:

  • Exercise -especially aerobic exercise such as running, walking, playing basketball, dancing, hiking, swimming, and tennis.
  • Eat right-vegetables, fruits, protein and be sure to drink enough water. Stay away from anything white-sugar, white rice, white potatoes. Remember, the darker the color, the more nutrients in the fruit or vegetable. For instance, eat more blueberries and dark green leafy vegetables.
  • Challenge your brain to work in novel ways-take a different route to work, learn something new on the computer, learn a new language (no matter how long it takes you!) start a new hobby or craft, take a class, use your non-dominant hand to brush your teeth, learn how to play a musical instrument, etc.
  • Explore new places or cultures; try different food and possibly learn how to make it.
  • Surround yourself with stimulating people and situations, go to museums, concerts, sporting events, etc.

Employee Assistance Program

419 W. Redwood St., Suite 560 Baltimore, MD 21201 667.214.1555 (Fax) 410.328.1132