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Mental health education

Road Rage

Do you or someone you love suffer from Road Rage? It can hurt you. If one person becomes more aggressive in his/her driving, it leads to others doing the same. Behind the wheel, before you are even aware of it, you can exhibit physical effects such as your hands gripping the wheel, blood pressure rising, heart rate increasing, neck and jaw muscles getting tense, etc. There are some things you can do. First, recognize what is happening to you. Set up your smart phone before you begin your trip to record you while you are driving. Play it back later and listen to yourself. You may be surprised as to how you sound. While you are driving, do some things to lighten your mood. Sing silly songs, make excuses for the driver (even if they are not true), such as “Oh, he must be trying to get to a job interview, after being out of work for 2 years. He can go ahead.” Try and remember that your perspective is what influences your feelings. Look at things differently and they may improve.

For further discussion about this, contact the EAP for individual sessions to help you cope with your anger or road rage. Call 8-5860

Facebook Can Make Users Feel Worse

A University of Michigan study found that time spent on Facebook could decrease a person’s mood. Other studies have found that increased envy can occur while reading other people’s Facebook pages. On the other hand, a study at the University of Wisconsin found that Facebook users could increase their self-esteem. In general, it seems that Facebook use, within which many activities take place, can have different effects on different people. Thus, it is important for users to be aware of their own responses as they use Facebook, monitor their moods and change behavior as needed.

If you think talking with someone would help you, call the EAP at 8-5860 and schedule an appointment to meet with a counselor

Facebook Can Make Users Feel Worse

A University of Michigan study found that time spent on Facebook could decrease a person’s mood.  Other studies have found that increased envy can occur while reading other people’s Facebook pages.  On the other hand, a study at the University of Wisconsin found that Facebook users could increase their self-esteem.  In general, it seems that Facebook use, within which many activities take place, can have different effects on different people.  Thus, it is important for users to be aware of their own responses as they use Facebook, monitor their moods and change behavior as needed.

If you think talking with someone would help you, call the EAP at 8-5860 and schedule an appointment to meet with a counselor

Autism and Aspergers

Did you know April is National Autism Awareness Month?

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. Autism is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum disorder” that affects individuals to varying degrees.

Are you living with a person with autism? Are you experiencing stress due to the high demands of caring for someone with autism? If so, you are not alone. The demands of living with a person with autism are great and families frequently experience high levels of stress and anxiety.

The Autism Society (www.autism-society.org) offers a variety of resources for families who are living with and/or caring for a person with autism. To talk with someone about how to cope with the stress and anxiety of autism, call the EAP at 410-328-5860.

Some people have a version of autism called Aspergers.  People with Aspergers are often very intelligent and can figure out a variety of problems, but have trouble reading people’s faces, or interpreting sarcasm or social cues.  If you would like help in improving your social skills, call the EAP to meet with a counselor today.  Or, you can email Maureen McCarren, LCSW-C at mmccarre@psych.umaryland.edu

Happy Spring!

Autism and Aspergers

Did you know April is National Autism Awareness Month?

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. Autism is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum disorder” that affects individuals to varying degrees.

Are you living with a person with autism? Are you experiencing stress due to the high demands of caring for someone with autism? If so, you are not alone. The demands of living with a person with autism are great and families frequently experience high levels of stress and anxiety.

The Autism Society (www.autism-society.org) offers a variety of resources for families who are living with and/or caring for a person with autism. To talk with someone about how to cope with the stress and anxiety of autism, call the EAP at 410-328-5860.

Some people have a version of autism called Aspergers.  People with Aspergers are often very intelligent and can figure out a variety of problems, but have trouble reading people’s faces, or interpreting sarcasm or social cues.  If you would like help in improving your social skills, call the EAP to meet with a counselor today.  Or, you can email Maureen McCarren, LCSW-C at mmccarre@psych.umaryland.edu

Happy Spring!

National Prevention Week is coming

SAMHSA has prevention ideas for you

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United States Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - A Life in the Community for Everyone: Behavioral Health is Essential to Health, Prevention Works, Treatment is Effective, People Recover

Support National Prevention Week, May 12‒18, 2013. Your voice. Your choice. Make a difference.

Help Support Prevention in Your Community

National Prevention Week 2013 will take place May 12–18, 2013. This year’s theme emphasizes that the prevention of substance abuse and promotion of mental health starts with the choices each of us makes in our own life. Through our choices, we can set an example of health and well-being for others. With our voices—whether spoken or written—we can raise awareness of behavioral health issues and help create healthier and safer communities.

You can plan and host your own events, participate in the “I Choose” project, or take the “Prevention Pledge” to show your support and help raise awareness about behavioral health issues.

Learn More About National Prevention Week 2013


Focus on Prevention

Learn How To Develop Your Own Prevention Strategy

This guide helps communities in planning and delivering substance abuse prevention strategies. It covers conducting needs assessments, identifying partners, creating effective strategies, marketing, reaching special populations, and evaluating your program. It includes a sample timeline of tasks and sample materials to save you time.

Order Focus on Prevention

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week

February 24- March 7, 2013 – National Eating Disorders Awareness week.

The aim of National Eating Disorders Awareness (NED) week is to increase outreach and awareness of eating disorders and body image disorders, while reducing stigma and improving access to treatment resources.  Eating disorders are serious, life threatening illnesses-not choices- and it is important to recognize the pressures, attitudes and behaviors that shape the disorder.  For more information and volunteer opportunities, go to www.nationaleatingdisorders.org, or call Jan Buxton, Senior Counselor in the EAP.  You can reach Jan by calling 410-328-5860 or emailing her at jbuxton@psych.umaryland.edu.

Employee Assistance Program
419 W. Redwood St., Suite 560 Baltimore, MD 21201 667.214.1555 (Fax) 410.328.1132